N.C. Industrial Commission and U.S. Department of Labor Team Up to Address Worker Misclassification 

North Carolina

    From JDSupra, J. Travis Hockaday reports that the United States Department of Labor signed an agreement with North Carolina to coordinate investigations and share information about misclassification of workers as independent contractors.  He write: On August 31, 2016, the North Carolina Industrial Commission, Employee Classification Section (the “Section”) and the Wage and Hour…

Janitor ‘Franchisees’ May Pursue Misclassification Class Action 

janitor-cleaning-supplies

  From BloombergBNA, Kevin McGowan discusses a case in which two janitor franchisees are claiming that they were misclassfied as independent contractors.  Kevin writes: Two janitors working as Jani-King “franchisees” in Philadelphia may pursue a class action alleging that they and about 300 similar franchisees are wrongly classified as independent contractors and should be deemed employees,…

Vermont Worker Misclassification Information Ad

Vermont map

  The Vermont Department of Labor issued an ad to assist employers and workers on the importance of classifying workers correctly. Source: Worker Misclassification Information Ad | Vermont Department of Labor   Vermont’s Department of Labor had previously developed this public service announcement.   Related posts:  US Labor Department and Vermont Department of Labor sign…

GrubHub Faces Lawsuit Alleging Worker Misclassification

grubhub-website-screenshot

  CPA Practice Advisor reports that drivers for GrubHub have started a class action lawsuit claiming that they were misclassified as independent contractors.  The report states: Drivers for the takeout food app GrubHub have filed a class-action lawsuit claiming the company misclassified them as independent contractors, thus paying them less than minimum wage and denying overtime…

Avoid These Common Mistakes in Classifying Workers

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From the National Law Review, Kelly D. Gemelli provides terrific reminders on five common employee classification mistakes.  Kelly writes: Mistake 1:Going by the written contract Despite what the agreement with the individual worker provides, thenature of the work relationship between the company and the worker determines how he or she is classified.  Some employers believe…